Interview with Teasenz

When you make more people aware of how your product or service can be of value to the world, you’re creating a need in the market that traditional business aren’t able to offer.

 

What motivated you to start an eco-friendly business/brand?
We are truly happy that tea is trending these days. More and more coffee drinkers are switching to tea due its unique health benefits. There is an fast increase in the amount of tea chains offering commercial blends and mixing in fancy ingredients in tea bags.

 

When we started Teasenz, we felt the way tea is presented isn’t the way it’s consumed for over thousands of years in China. With Teasenz, we aim to broadcast our heritage by sharing authentic Chinese teas with the world as well as presenting the traditional ways of preparation.

 

The benefit of true authentic teas, they aren’t part of large scale productions, including the use of machines and pesticides, that can damage the environment. Instead, they are from small scale farms and picked and processed manually by hand.

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Can you tell us what’s special about your brand/business?

Instead of commercial blends and tea bags, we only offer pure loose leaf teas. All our teas direct from farmers who truly love tea. Teas that are made the traditional way without the involvement of machines, pesticides and without blending in artificial ingredients. We appreciate the flavors and aromas that are offered by nature.

 

What green issues are you most passionate about?

What we worry the most about is how large scale tea production damages the environmental balance in tea regions. What you see with big tea factories is that clear big areas of land for producing tea. The problem is that small tea plants and trees hold less water than the plants and trees that were also originally growing in the region. Take for example the Wuyishan tea region where the famous Dahongpao and Jinjunmei are produced. Around 10 years ago it had many beautiful waterfalls, but today the area is fully planted with tea trees. As a result some beautiful waterfalls are slowly disappearing.

 

When we source our teas, it’s our responsibility to take into account these environmental concerns, besides just looking at tea quality and worker conditions.
What advice would you have for other aspiring social and green entrepreneurs?

Different from non-green businesses, startups that start off with a green mindset will already have a large advantage. The only challenge is the way you communicate this to society. When you make more people aware of how your product or service can be of value to the world, you’re creating a need in the market that traditional business aren’t able to offer. Focus on this in early stages of your startup.

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